Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Brad Collins Mayor, Morehead Ky: The Morehead News



Standing Ovation
 
 
Standing ovation
Stephanie Ockerman photo
Following his 13 years as Mayor of Morehead, and after the community honored him last week at the Morehead Conference Center, Brad Collins sat down with Morehead News Executive Editor Denver Brown and offered personal comments on his time in office and on his plans for the future…

Q — Has it sunk in, yet? That you aren’t going into the office you held for the past 13 years?

A - It really didn't sink in until I started to leave on Friday afternoon, and handed in all my keys and my city car, and said goodbye to my staff. Then on Monday I went in to pick up some things and suddenly realized that I would never be back. That made really sad for a while.

Q — What the first thing you want to tackle now that you are officially retired?

A - My wife has a honey do list of 13 years for me to work on, and that will take a while. I would also like to re-finish some furniture that I have been putting off for several years. And it would be nice to travel some, and get to see my grandchildren more. I would also like to stay active in affordable housing work of some kind, and our sister city program.

Q — Looking back, would you do it all again? The same way?

A - Yes, exactly the same!! I learned early in my term as mayor that we have to work together to be able to build and sustain the kind of community that we want and need for our people. The progress that we have experienced has been because of this sense of cooperation and togetherness that we have in our town.

Q — How would you want the people of Morehead to think of you and your administration years from now?

A - My mother, bless her soul, raised 9 children by herself, and I would like to be remembered by what is engraved on her gravestone, "She Did What She Could". She didn't do any great and earth-shattering things while she was on this earth, she just did the job that the Lord gave her to do. I always have tried to do the right thing as mayor, but sometimes that doesn't seem to be the most popular thing to do. I hope the citizens of Morehead realize that the many mistakes that I have made have been honest mistakes, or made out of ignorance.

Q — During your time in the mayor’s chair, what are you most proud of?

A - If I could be proud of any thing that we have done, it would be the affordable housing projects that that we have completed, especially in the West Morehead area where I grew up. I am convinced that one of the most important things you can do for a family is to help them be able to own and pay for a decent, safe, sanitary, and affordable home that they can call their own. It does so much for a family's self respect, and their sense of belonging in the community, and actually makes better citizens of them.

Q — Anything specific you feel you left unfinished or wish you had more time to work on?

A - The Scholar House Program that we applied for last year was a big disappointment when it didn't get funded, and I hope the city leaders will keep trying to get this very important project finished.

Q — Few if any elected officials will talk about failures, but are there objectives or projects you believe were not completed to your liking?

A - There are always things you should have done that you didn't do, and so many things you that you did do that you should not have done. But I hope the citizens of Morehead realize that all of the mistakes and failures of my administration were honest and without being influenced by special interests, or personal gain.

Q — How would you describe these past 13 years in terms of how that time span impacted our community of Morehead?

A - We have had an unprecedented era of peace, prosperity, and growth in our community in the past 13 years. This didn't happen by accident!! This came about by all the governmental bodies, the businesses, all of our major employers and businesses working together for the common good of us all!!! We all had to put our own personal agendas and prejudices aside and work for the betterment of the entire community. I would urge us all to continue to do this.

Q — Any ambition to run for office at another level? Why?

A - I have learned the hard way to never say never when asked this question. I said I would never run for city council or mayor, but here I am, or was. There are no plans at present to do anything but enjoy my retirement, but who knows what the future may hold. Spoken like a true politician, yes?

Q — It’s certainly tough to thank everyone and you’ve talked recently about so many groups and individuals who have helped you along the way --- can you expand on those?

A - It has been a great honor to represent the citizens of Morehead for the past 13 years. Morehead has the BEST volunteers, the most intelligent volunteers, and the most dedicated volunteers that I have ever seen anywhere, or at any time. A community cannot operate without its volunteers, and that being said, the City of Morehead will continue to thrive and grow as long as we have these types of people living here.

Q — Any advice to future officials of Morehead and Rowan County?

A - Never Give UP!!! NEVER. The conference center took almost 11 years to come to fruition. The Boodry Place project took 6 years to complete. If we have a dream for our community, and the commitment to see it through no matter what, we can accomplish anything by working together. My motto has always been, as the school system is, "Together We Can".

Q — Of course there are many, but if you had to choose just one aspect of your previous job what will you miss the most?

A - Without a doubt, the people. I have always enjoyed talking with people, and helping people, and I will miss this. But the ones I will miss most are the wonderful employees of our city. In case you all don't know this, the City of Morehead has the most professional, most dedicated, and most loving employees that I have ever been or ever will have the privilege to be associated with. It has been such a pleasure to work with each and every one of you as your mayor. Never did I ever think as I was growing up in this town that I would some day be able represent you all over the world. It has been a privilege to serve as your mayor.

From all of us in the Morehead/Rowan County community, thank you Mayor Collins for your hard work, commitment and dedication -- and for making our town a better place to call home!

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

CHEROKEE APPLICATIONS: Benjamin Collins Rejected; son of Shepherd Collins

    CHEROKEE APPLICATIONS

    332500
    Rejected
    Cousin of 16346
    Benjamin Collins Rejected
    resided Baire Branch, Ivyton, Magoffin County. Born Breathitt County, Kentucky.
    What right do you claim to share? by one my mother Louisa Cole
    Name of wife; Mary Jane Collin age 46
    Father John Collins
    Indian name Cherokee
    Mother Louisa Collins
    Indian name Cherokee
    Maiden Name Louisa Cole
    Father and mother born in Kentucky Resided in Kentucky in 1851
    Father dec'd
    Mother living
    Name brothers and sister
    Fealdon Collins
    Pollyan Collins
    Shepherd Collins
    Jane Collins dec's date not known
    Wallis Collins ages not known
    State English and Indian names of grandparents
    Father's Side
    Shepherd Collins
    Polly Collins
    Mother's side
    Tiney Cole Sr.
    Mariah Cole
    Names of children
    Tiney and Mariah Cole
    Jerah Cole dec's in 1870
    Louisa Cole
    Perlinea Cole
    George Cole dec'd
    Adam Cole
    Rufus Cole dec'd died in 1872
    Tiney Cole
    John W. cole
    Balance of there deaths not known
    Shepherd and Polly Collins
    Hiram Collins dec'd
    John Collins dec'd
    Sarah Collins dec'd
    Susanna Collins dec'd
    Adam Collins dec'd
    Supplemental Applicaton for Minor Children
    Full Name Benj Collins
    Res; Ivyton, Magoffin Co., Ky
    Date and place of birth Oct 15, 1869
    married to Mary J. Collins 27 yrs
    Children;
    Buddy Collins 14 born Oct 29, 1893
    Flem Collins 12 March 25, 1895
    Boon Collins 8 May 6 1899
    Miranda Collins Rejected
    English name; Miranda J. Collins
    Residence; Ivyton, Magoffin Co., Kentucky
    How old are you; 47 Born; Aug 12, 1860
    Where were you born; Johnson Co., Ky
    Name of husband; Shepherd Collins 47 years
    To what tribe of Indians does he or she belong? Cherokee
    Give names of your father and mother Berry Dale -- Chaney Cole
    Name all your brothers and sisters
    Dan'l Dale
    Bitha Dale
    Lois Dale
    Roscoe Dale
    Maxey Dale
    Lena Dale
    State English and Indian names of your grandparents on both father;s and mother's side
    Father's side; Reuben Dale
    Mother's side; Jack Cole
    Give names of all their children
    Manda Dale
    Charty Dale
    Cheriah Dale
    Arter Dale
    Pleas Dale
    Harden Dale
    Affadavit
    Personally appeared before me Harris Howard and Albert Pace who being duly sworn on oath depose and say that they are well acquainted with Miranda J. Collins ., who make the foregoing application and statements, and have known him for 10 years and 10 years, respectively and know her to be the identical person he represent herself to be and that the statements made by her are true to the best of their knowledge and belief and they have no interest whatsover in her claim.
    H. C. Howard
    Albert Pace
    28 August 1907
    Anderson Cole Rejected
    Aug, 1 1907
    1. English Name: Anderson Cole
    2. Town and post office: Ivyton
    3. County: Magoffin
    4. State: Kentucky
    5. Date and place of Birth: Knox County, Ky Apr 25 1833
    6. By what right do you claim to share? If you claim through more than one relative living in 1851, set forth each claim separately? Through my Father Jack Cole and my myself .
    7. Are you married? yes
    8. Name and age of wife or husband: Elizabeth Antrobus born in 1848, years old 57 when she died.
    9. Give names of your father and mother, and your mother's name before marriage.
    Father
    English name: Jack Cole
    Indian name: Cherokee
    Mother
    English name: Peggy Higgins
    Indian name: Cherokee
    Maiden name: Peggy Higgins
    10. Where were they born?
    Father: Buncomb Co, North Carolina
    Mother: Richmond Virginia
    11. Where did they reside in 1851, if living at that time?
    Father: Lee co Virginia
    Mother: Richmond Virginia
    12. Date of death of your father and mother?
    Father: Mch 7th 1864
    Mother: don't know
    13. Were they ever enrolled for annuities, land, or other benefits? No
    14. Name all your brothers and sisters, giving ages, and if not living , the date of death:
    i. Mary E. Cole
    ii. Emanuel Cole
    iii. Alvira Cole
    iv. John Cole
    v. Harrison Cole
    vi. Elizabeth Cole Born Oct 1838
    vii. Thomas J. Cole 1831
    15. Sate English and Indian names of your grandparents on both father's and mother's side, if possible:
    My grandfather was John C. Cole, my grandmother was Cuzzie Cole.
    16. Where were they born? North Carolina
    17. Where did they reside in 1851, if living at the time? Don't know.
    18. Give names of all their children and residence, if living ; if not living, give dates of deaths:
    Luana Cole, Ezekiel Cole, Jack Cole, Charles Cole, Wm Cole, Wils Cole date of Deaths all unknown to me Except Jack Cole died Mac 7th 1864
    Sir:
    I hereby make application for such share as may be due my minor children of the fund appropriated by Act of Congress approved June 30, 1906, in accordance with the decree of the Court of Claims of May 18, 1905, and May 28, 1906, in favor of the Eastern Cherokees, and I ask that this be made part of my original application No. 31697
    1. State your full name: Anderson Cole
    2. Residence and post office: Ivyton
    3. County: Magoffin
    4. State: Kentucky
    5. Date and place of birth: born April 25th 1833 Knox Co., Ky
    6. Are you married: yes
    7. Name and age of wife or husband: wife dead.
    8. To what tribe of Indians, if any, does he or she belong: Cherokee
    9. Names of all your children who were living on May 28, 1906:
    1. W. J. Cole, age 18, 1889 May 30
    10. Were they ever enrolled for money, annuities, land, or other benefits? If so, state when and where, and with what tribe of Indians: No
    Remarks: signed Anderson Cole
    16 Aug 1907
    D B Galyer
    My commission expires Mch 2, 1908
    Affidavit
    Personally appeared before me J. F. Atkeson and Augustus Arnett who, being duly sworn, on oath depose and say they were well acquaninted with Anderson Cole who makes the foregoing application and statement, and have known him for years and years, respectively, and know him to be the identical person he represents himself to be, and that the statements made by him are true, and they have no interest, whatever in this claim.
    Signatures of Witnesses
    J. F. Atkeson
    Augustus Arnett
    29th day of July 1907
    Notary Public B W Higgins
    Commission expires Mch 14th 1908
    Affidavit:
    Personally appeared before me J. W. Cole and Harrison Cole who, being duly sworn, on oath depose and say that they are well acquainted with Anderson Cole who makes the foregoing application and statement, and have known him for 30 years and 35 years, respectively, and know him to be the identical person he represents himself to be, and that on May 28, 1906, he had the children living as above set forth, and that the statements made by him are true, and they have no interest whatever in this claim.
    signatures of Witnesses,
    J W Cole
    Harrison Cole
    16th Aug 1907
    Anderson Cole, being duly sworn and examined, deposes says:
    My name is Anderson Cole: I was born in Knox Co., Ky in 1833: I claim my Indian blood thru my father. I make no claim thru my mother: she was of Dutch and French descent: my father was born in N.C. in 1827; my father died in 1862. I think it was in Buncombe C. in 1787: my father died in 1862. My father claimed his Cherokee Indian blood thru both his father and mother; I think my grandmother's maiden name was Cuzzie Anderson. I never saw the grandparents thru whom I claim: My grandmother thru whom I claim died before I was born so I have been told. I don't know when my grandfather died. He died in Lawrence Co. Ky,.
    I am unable to trace my Cherokee ancestry back farther than my grandparents.
    I have an older sister who if living at the present time would be over a hundred years old. She was born in Lee Co. Va.
    In 1835 I think my grandfather lived in Lawrence Co. Ky. my grandfather came to Kentucky from Tenn before I was born.
    In 1835 I think my father and I lived in Lee Co, Va. In 1851 I think my grandfather was dead. In 1851 my father and I lived in Lee Co. Va.
    I heard that my father and I lived with the Cherokees as members of the tribe. At the time of my birth 1855 neither my father or grandfather lived with the Cherokees. None of the Ancestors thru whom I claim were ever held in bondage. None of the ancestors thru whom I claim were ever enrolled. none ever received any money or land as an Indian. None of my relatives ever went to the Indian Territory and received land there as an Indian. Each of the grandparents thru whom I claim were three quarter Cherokee. My father was always a voter. I have always been regarded in the community in which I lived as being of Cherokee and white parentage.
    signed Anderson Cole
    Shepherd Cole Rejected
    Received Feb. 1, 1907
    1. English Name: Shepherd Cole
    2. Indian Name: Cherokee
    3. Residence: Gullett, Ky
    4. Town and post office: Gullett
    5. County: Magoffin
    6. State: Kentucky
    7. Date and place of Birth: Floyd County, Ky Feb. 24, 1849
    8. By what right do you claim to share? If you claim through more than one relative living in 1851, set forth each claim separately?
    I claim through my Father Charles Cole and my Mother Charlotte Cole also myself Sheperd Cole
    9. Are you married? yes, twice 1st wife Nancy J Cole born. Sept. 10, 1851 Sy and died Dec. 6, 1905
    10. Name and age of wife or husband: Deemas Patrick born Jan. 6, 1870 last wife
    11. Give names of your father and mother, and your mother's name before marriage.
    Father
    English name: Charles Cole died July 14, 1878
    Indian name: Cherokee
    Mother
    English name: Charlotte Cole died Oct 23, 1898
    Indian name: Cherokee
    Maiden name: Charlotte Cole
    12. Where were they born?
    Father: Lee County, Va
    Mother: Kentucky
    Where did they reside in 1851, if living at that time?
    Father: On Licking River in Floyd, Co. Ky
    Mother: On Licking River in Floyd, Co. Ky
    13. Date of death of your father and mother?
    Father: July 14, 1878
    Mother: Oct. 23, 1898
    14. Were they ever enrolled for annuities, land, or other benefits? No
    15. Name all your brothers and sisters, giving ages, and if not living , the date of death:
    i. Wallis Cole B. July 14, 1847
    ii. Sheperd Cole b. Feb. 24, 1849
    iii. Apperson Cole b. Mar. 10, 1851, d. July 1901
    iv. Nancy Jane Cole b. Jan 13, 1853
    v. Meredith Cole b. Apr. 25, 1855, d. Apr 24, 1881
    vi. Page Cole b. Dec. 31, 1857
    vii. Cam Cole b. July 22, 1862, d. unknown
    16. Sate English and Indian names of your grandparents on both father's and mother's side, if possible:
    Wm Campbell was my Father's Father Louana Cole was my Father's mother. William Cole was my mother's Father. Biddy Collins was my Mother's Mother.
    17. Where were they born? unknown
    18. Where did they reside in 1851, if living at the time? Louana Cole lived in Tenn. in 1851 and Wm Cole lived in Floyd Co., Ky in 1851.
    19. Give names of all their children and residence, if living ; if not living, give dates of deaths:
    Louana Coles brothers and sisters: English name: John Cole, Charles Cole, Nancy Cole, Margret Cole, Polly Cole. All dead date of death unknown except Nancy died Dec. 16, 1906.
    Wm Cole brohter and sisters"
    English name: Kizziah Cole, Tiney Cole, Oma Cole, Mima Cole, George Cole, Charlotte Cole, John Cole, Sookey Cole and Hiram Cole.
    Sir:
    I hereby make application for such share as may be due my minor children of the fund appropriated by Act of Congress approved June 30, 1906, in accordance with the decree of the Court of Claims of May 18, 1905, and May 28, 1906, in favor of the Eastern Cherokees, and I ask that this be made part of my original application No. 31697
    1. State your full name: Shepherd Cole
    2. Residence and post office: Gullett, Magoffin Co., Ky
    3. County: Magoffin
    4. State: Kentucky
    5. Date and place of birth: born Feb. 24, 1849 in Floyd Co., Ky
    6. Are you married: yes, Twice
    7. Name and age of wife or husband: 1st wife Nancy J. Cole b. Sept. 10, 1850
    8. To what tribe of Indians, if any, does he or she belong: Cherokee
    9. Names of all your children who were living on May 28, 1906:
    i. Lois E. Cole, age 36, b. Sept 19, 1870 married G W Maddox 22 Dec 1887
    ii. John Morgan Cole, age 25, b. Oct 23, 1881 marroed Emily Gullett 5 mar 1903
    iii. Melsena(?) Cole, age 13, b. June 20, 1894
    10. Were they ever enrolled for money, annuities, land, or other benefits? If so, state when and where, and with what tribe of Indians: No
    Remarks:
    I was married the 2nd time to Deemas Patrick Mch 1st. 1906. My Great Grand Father John Cole moved from North Carolina to Tennessee about 20 years ago or more. My grandfather William Cole came to Ky from Tenn about 100 years ago before 1830.
    Affidavit
    Personally appeared before me James M. Collins and Charles d Minix who, being duly sworn, on oath depose and say they were well acquainted with Shepard Cole who makes the foregoing application and statement, and have known him for 33 years and 16 years, respectively, and know him to be the identical person he represents himself to be, and that in May 28, 1906, he had the children living as the above set forth, and that the statements made by him are true, and they have no interest, whatever in this claim.
    Signatures of Witnesses
    James M. Collins
    Charles Minix
    15th day of July 1907
    Notary Public E. M. Howard
    Commission expires Jan 17th 1910
    Affidavit:
    Personally swear that the foregoing statements made by me are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.
    Shepherd Cole
    29th Jan 1907
    commission expires Mch 13th 1908 B. W. Higgins N.P. W.C
    Witnesses: Nelson Salyer known 55 years and Whitaker known 25 years.
    Shepherd Cole, being duly sworn and examined, deposes says:
    My name is Shepherd Cole: I was born in Floyd Co., Ky in 1849: I claim my Cherokee Indian blood thru both my father and mother: my father was born in Lee Co., Va. in 1827; my mother was born in Kentucky, I don't know the county. in 1826: my father got his Cherokee blood thru his mother : my father's mothers maiden name was Luana Cole: my father was illegitimate child and took the name of his mother: I have been told by my grandmother that she was born in Tenn or N.C. I don't know county. I do not know the year in which she was born; Luana Cole got her Indian blood thru both her father and mother: Her fathers name was John Cole: I don't remember her mothers name. I've heard from my grandmother that my great grandparents as members of the Cherokee tribe in N. C. I do not know when they lived with them or in what County of N. C. I do not know when my great grandparents died.
    My mother claimed her Indian blood thru her father who was a brother of Luana Cole, my grandmother.
    In 1835 my father lived in Lee Co., Va and my mother lived Ky. In 1851 I and my parents lived in Floyd Co. Ky. None of my ancestors were ever enrolled that I know of: none ever received any Indian money or land as an Indian: none of the ancestors thru whom I claim were ever held in bondage.: none of the ancestors thru whom I claim ever had a Indian name that I know of:
    My grandfather thru whom I claim was a three fourth Cherokee. My grandmother Luana Cole was also a 3-4 Cherokee. All my ancestors have always been regarded as Cherokee Indian and English descent.
    My mothers father moved from Tenn. to Ky before 1835.
    Signed Shepherd Cole
    #42247 Easter Bailey is the great grand daughter of Luana Cole;
    #41518 Fielden Collins is my second cousin. His grandfather Tiny Cole is the brother to my mother.
    #39993 Dorcus Nickles gradndmother Sucky Nickles was my mothers sister
    #34765 Newton Cole is my first cousin. His grandfather's name was William Cole. "
    Tiney Cole Rejected
    English Name Tiney Cole
    Indian Name tiney Cole
    Residence; Ivyton, Magoffin Co., Ky
    Date and place of birth; June 8th 1858 -Magoffin Co., Ky
    By what right do you claim to share? If you claim through more than one relative living
    By Father- Tiney Cole- and mother Mariah Cole
    Wife; Sarah cole age 60 yrs
    Father English name; Tiney Cole
    Father Indian name; Tiney Cole
    Mother English name; Mariah Cole
    Mother Indian nane; Mariah Cole
    Where wee they born
    Father; Ky
    Mother; Ky
    Where did they reside in 1851 if living at that time?
    Father; Floyd Co., Ky
    Mother; Floyd Co., Ky
    Date of death of your father; 1905 -- mother; 1890
    Name all your brothers and sister, giving ages, and if not living the date of death
    Jerry Cole dec'd
    George Cole ''
    Adam Cole living
    Rufus Cole dec'd
    John Wesley Cole living
    State English and Indian name of your grandparents on both father's and mother's side, if possible
    Father's side; Wm Cole Sr. Mother's side; Jackson Cole
    Where did they reside in 1851; Kentucky
    Give names of all their children and residence if living; if not living give dates of death
    English name; Tiney Cole, George Cole Sr. Mima Cole , Outa [?] Cole, Lottie Cole, John cole, Hiram Cole,
    Mother's side; Unknown except Anderson cole
    to expedite identification claimants should give the full English and Indian names, if possible, of their paternal and maternal ancestors back to 1835;
    Father's side; William Cole - Biddy Cole
    Mother's side; Jackson Cole
    Affadavit
    Personally appeared before me M.C. Kash and Nelson Salyer who being duly sworn on oath depose and say that they are well acquainted with Tiney Cole Jr., who make the foregoing application and statements, and have known him for 3 years and 15 years, respectively and know him to be the identical person he represent himself to be and that the statements made by him are true to the best of their knowledge and belief and they have no interest whatsover in his claim.
    M.C. Kash
    Nelson Salyer
    29th of July 1907
    Kizziah Gibson Rejected
    Residence; Gulleltt Kentucy
    Aunt of 31695 and claims throught the same source
    [31695 is Christina Cole, daughter of Hezekiah Gibson]
    How old are you [1837] born in Tennessee
    Are you married No
    To what tribe of Indians does he or she belong? Cherokee
    Father and Mother; Bryson Gibson and Fannie Gibson
    Where were they born?
    Father; in Virginia or Tenn
    Mother; '' ''
    Where did they reside in 1851 Don't know [Hezekiah/Kiah Gibsons
    application says they lived in Morgan Co., Ky.]
    Father died 1865
    Mother died 1867
    Brothers and sisters
    Tyra Gibson
    Polly Gibson
    Dice Gibson
    Alex Gibson
    Betty Gibson
    Ava Gibson
    Burl Gibson
    Kiah Gibson
    State English and Indian names of your grandparents
    Thomas Gibson
    Polly Gibson
    August 23rd, 1907
    Personally appeared T. J. Arnett and J. J. Pace who being duly sworn
    on oath depose and say that they are well acquainted with Kiah
    Gibson.......
    Kezziah Gibson being duly sworn and examined deposes and says;
    My name is Kizziah Gibson; I was born in Wise Co., Va., in 1836; I claim my Cherokee blood thru both my father and mother I think my gather was born in Wise Co., Va., about 1785; he died in 1865. My mother was born in Wise Co., Va., about 1785 . My mother died in 1870; In 1835 I and my father and mother lived in Wise Co., Va. In 1851 I and the ancestors thru whom I [claim?] lived in Floyd Co., Ky. In 1835 the grandparents thru whom I claim lived in Wise Co., Va. In 1835 my parents and grandparents thru whom I claim lived among the cherokees in Wise Co., Va. I don't know whether they lived as members of the ribe or not; none of the ancestors thru whom I claim were ever held in bondage; none of the ancestors thru whom I claim were ever enrolled that I know of and never received any money or land as an Indian; none of my ancestors ever had an Indian name that I know of;
    I never heard my grandparents say how much Indian blood they had; they always told me that we belonged to the Cherokee generation. My father was a voter. In this community I have always been regarded as having Cherokee Indian blood
    Kezziah Gibson
    Subscribe and Sworn to before me this 29th day of July 1908 at Salyersville, Ky.
    Kiah Gibson Rejected
    English name; Kiah Gibson
    Residence; Ivyton, Magoffin Co., Ky
    How old are you; 70 Born; 1837
    Where were you born; Virginia
    Name of wife; Margaret Hensley
    What tirbe of Indians does he or she belong? None
    Name all your children who were living on May 28, 1906 giving their ages
    Clerinda Gibson 58
    Marlena Gibson 52
    Jerry Gibson 49
    Jo g. Gibson 45
    Christina Gibson 40
    Bob Gibson 39
    Give names of your father and mother; Bryson Gibson -- Fannie Green
    Father English name; Bryson Gibson
    Indian name; Cherokee
    Mother English name; Fannie Green
    Indian name;
    Where did they reside in 1851, if living at that time?
    Father; Morgan Co., Ky
    Date of death
    father; 1867
    mother; 1877
    Name all your brothers and sisters, giving ages
    Tyra Gibson
    Polly Gibson
    Burl Gibson
    Alex Gibson
    Betty Gibson
    Dice Gibson
    Ira Gibson
    Ava Gibson
    Nancy Gibson
    Squire Gibson
    State English and Indian names of your grandparents on both father's and mother's side if possible
    Father's side; Thomas Gibson -- Franky Gibson
    I solemnly swear that the foregoing statments made by me are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.
    Kiah Gibson
    March 14th, 1908
    Affadavit
    Personally appeared before me T.J. Arnett and J.J. Pace who being duly sworn on oath depose and say that they are well acquainted with Kiah Gibson, who make the foregoing application and statements, and have known him for 15 years and 15 years, respectively and know him to be the identical person he represent himself to be and that the statements made by him are true to the best of their knowledge and belief and they have no interest whatsover in his claim.
    T.J. Arnett
    J.J> Pace
    March 14, 1908
    Calvin Gibson Rejected
    English Name Calvin Gibson
    Residence Salyersville
    County; Magoffin
    State: Kentucky
    How old are you ; 54 Born May 24th, 1853
    Where were you born; Breathitt Co., Ky.
    Name and age of wife; Mariah Cole 53 years old
    What tribe of Indians does she belong ? Cherokee
    Name all your children who were living on May 29
    Rene Gibson 33 May 26 1874
    Ira Gibson 29 May 2, 1879
    Bunk Gibson 25 Apr 16 1882
    Stella Gibson 22 Mch 29, 1885
    Crit Gibson 19 Sept 13 1888
    Clay Gibson 18 Jun 5 1889
    Wm Gibson 16 Sept 14 1891
    Give names of your father and mother and your mother's name before marriage
    Ira Gibson Polly Nickels
    Father -- English name Ira Gibson
    Indian name Cherokee
    Mother-- English name Polly Nickels
    Indian name Cherokee
    Where were they born?
    Father; Tennessee
    Mother; Kentucky
    Where did they reside in 1851 if living at that time?
    Father; Ky
    Mother Ky
    Date of death of your father and mother
    Father; Died in 1905
    Mother Apl 1907
    Name all your brothers and sisters giving ages and residences if possible
    Have None
    State English and Indian names of your grandparents on both father's and mother's side if possible'
    Father's side; Bryson Gibson -Fannie Gibson
    Mother's side Wm. Nickels - Betty Nickels
    Where were they born; Tenn & Ky
    Where did they reside in 1851; in Ky
    Give names of all their children and residence if possible
    Kiah Gibson
    Squire Gibson
    Burl Gibson
    Aly Gibson
    Tyre Gibson
    Betty Gibson
    Dice gibson
    Kezziah Gibson
    Wm Nickels
    Jr Nickels
    John Nickels
    Tom Nickels [?]
    Nancy Nickels
    Tempy Nickels
    Haney Nickels
    Affidavit
    Personally appeared before me Noah Patrick and S. E. Hager who being duly sworn on oath depsos and say they the are well acquainted with Calvin Gibson who makes the foregoing application and statements, and have known him for 10 and 15 years repsectively, and know him to be the identical person he represents himself to be, and that the statements made by him are true to the best of their knowledge and belief, and they have no interest whatever in this claim.
    Signatures f Witnesses
    Noah Patrick
    S. E. Hager
    Subscribe and sworn to before me this 21st day of Aug 1907.
    DREWRY LAWSON
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
    Washington, D.C.
    Sirs:
    I hereby make application for such share as may be due me of the fund
    appropriated by the Act of congress approved June 30, 1906, in accordance
    with the decrees of the Court of Claims of May 18, 1905, and May 28, 1906,
    in favor of the Eastern Cherokees. The evidence of identity is herewith
    subjoined.
    1. State full name -
    English name: Drewry Lawson
    Indian name:Benge
    2. Residence and post office:Bigfall Tennessee
    County: Hancock
    State: Tennessee
    5. How old are you? I was born Aug 18, 1878
    6. Where were you born? Born near Bigfall
    7. By what right do you claim to share? My father W.J.K. Lawsons great
    grandfather Drewry Lawson a half brother to chief Cherokee Indian Benge, and
    great grandmother a Cherokee Indian Woman
    8. Are you married? Yes
    9. Name and age of wife or husband: I was born August 18, 1878 my wife Nancy
    Hatfield born Oct. 19, 1872
    Give names of your father and mother, and your mothers name before marriage.
    Father-English name: W.J.K. Lawson
    Indian name: Benge
    Mother-English name: Elizabeth B. Legear
    Indian name: white so far as I know
    Maiden name: Elizabeth B. Legear
    Where were they born?
    Father: one half mile east of Bigfall
    Mother: one mile west of Bigfall
    Where did they reside in 1851, if living at that time?
    Father: one half mile east of Bigfall
    Mother: Not born until 1855
    Date of death of your father and mother;
    Father: living Mother: living
    Were they ever enrolled for annuities, land, or other benefits? If so, state
    when and where: about May 20th 1892 or 1893 O. B Johnson enrolled them at
    Bigfall Tenn and us children pap paid him $20.00 for enrolling us all.
    Name all your brothers and sisters, giving ages, and if not living, the date
    of death:
    George? W. Lawson born 1867 Living in Oregon
    Elisha R. Lawson
    Alvin T. Lawson
    John T. Lawson
    4 brothers and 2 sisters under age
    State English and Indian names of your grandparents on both fathers and
    mothers side, if possible:
    Fathers side: Drewry Lawson Mothers side: Alie B. Dodson
    Indian name: Benge White so far as I know
    Where were they born? Grandfather eight miles of Bigfall Tennessee in Hancock
    County and grandmother at Bigfall.
    Where did they reside in 1851, if living at that time? Near Bigfall Tennessee
    Give names of all their children, and residence, if living; if not living,
    give dates of deaths:
    English name: W.J.K. Lawson at Bigfall
    Indian name: Benge
    Residence Bigfall
    English name: all the balance of my uncles and aunts is dead without issue
    except 2 half aunts. My grandfather was married twice.
    English name: Nancy Virginia Sutton still living
    Indian name: Benge
    Residence: near Bigfall Tenn
    English name: Martha T. Hatfield living
    Indian name: Benge
    Residence: near Bigfall Tennessee
    Have you ever been enrolled for annuities, land, or other benefits? Is so,
    state when and where:
    About May 20, 1892 or 1893 Mr. O.B. Johnson enrolled me at Bigfall Tennessee
    Records have burned up March 5, 1905
    To expedite identification, claimants should give the full English and
    Indian names, if possible, or their paternal and maternal ancestors back to
    1835:
    My father W.J.K Lawsons great grandfather Drewry Lawson was half brother to
    chief Cherokee Benge, and his great grandmother a Cherokee Indian Woman.
    Remarks
    (under this head the applicant may give any additional information that he
    believes will assist in proving his claims.
    3 of my fathers uncles and 2 of his aunts looked to be one half Indians. 2
    of my uncles looked to be close skin to the Indians. One of my brothers
    looks to be ¼ Indian and one of my sisters looks to be one eighth Indian.
    I solemnly swear that the foregoing statements made by me are true to the
    best of my knowledge and belief.
    Signature: Drewrey Lawson
    Subscribed and sworn to before me this 3rd day of Sept 1906.
    J.N. Campbell Notary Public Sneedville Tennessee
    AFFIDAVIT
    (The following affidavit must be sworn to by two or more witnesses who are
    well acquainted with the applicants.)
    Personally appeared before me James R. Johns and James N. Willis who, being
    duly sworn, on oath depose and say that they are well acquainted with Drewry
    Lawson who makes the foregoing application and statements, and
    have know him for 10 -years respectively, and know him to be the identical
    person he represents himself to be, and that the statements made by him are
    true, to the best of their knowledge and belief, and they have no interest
    whatever in his claim.
    Cherokee Applications Part I
    DOCUMENTING THE MELUNGEONS

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Snowstorm socialism and the T


By Jane Collins
medford@wickedlocal.com

Posted Apr. 6, 2015 at 2:13 PM

MEDFORD
Bostonians put so much time and effort into moving snow this winter, we could have built a whole new city by now, preferably someplace warm and sunny. Why are we living here, again?
We’ll remember why this month, or maybe next. New Englanders appreciate spring more than anybody.
Our joy will be mostly relief that we survived this brute of a winter. We will also be happy to see any color that isn’t white or gray, and to experience any weather that isn’t trying to kill us.
Some people got to spend the winter elsewhere. There wasn’t much of a downside. Except now that spring has come, they can’t say they earned it. Others will relate their adventures; they will bite their tongues.

Another of the few things snowbirds missed was the sense of community that sometimes comes with a shared disaster. Snow is no respecter of status. It’s just as hard to dig out a new BMW as an old Chevy.
We’ve all groaned at the forecasts of more snow, spent countless hours getting to work and back and once we finally got home, searched online for funny pictures of snow sculptures to send friends in warmer climates.
In my neighborhood, four households have snow blowers. They managed to keep most of the sidewalks clear.
When one man’s job kept him out plowing, the others covered for him at home. People took turns digging out neighbors who could neither do it themselves nor afford to hire anyone to do it for them. A long-handled rake became, essentially, community property.
We all cheered for the city trucks that opened our streets back up. It was a sort of snowstorm socialism. Just as there are supposedly no atheists in a foxhole, there are no libertarians in a blizzard.
This kind of winter reminds us that it takes more than private enterprise to keep our city going. It takes government: city, state and federal.
We pay taxes so those services will be there when we need them. But this winter, the MBTA let us down. Tens of thousands had to wait, shivering and miserable, for buses that came hours late to replace trains that didn’t come at all. What lies behind such a massive failure?
Our new governor claimed to be shocked at the T’s supposed mismanagement. He seems to have forgotten that 20 years ago, as the top financial officer of the Weld administration, he made deep cuts to the budget for maintaining and upgrading the T, cuts that have never been restored.
Baker also loaded much of the cost of the Big Dig onto the transit system, even though it didn’t help T riders. Why should people on the bus pay for people in cars?
Budget-cutters like Baker always target programs that don’t affect their own class. They cut services for the poor, they cut housing and fuel subsidies, they cut public education — especially higher education — and they cut public transit.
They cut unionized state workers and give their jobs to low-paying private contractors. They cut monitoring and oversight, and they cut maintenance.

Then they brag about making government more efficient.
The problem is, these cuts don’t make government more efficient. They make it less able to do the work we need it to do. Cuts that save money this year are going to cost much more money later on.
If you cut cheap preventive care, eventually people will need expensive emergency services. If you cut support for higher education, our workforce becomes less employable. People who go to college anyway will be more burdened by debt, meaning they won’t be able to spend the money that keeps our economy healthy.
And if you cut maintenance, sooner or later, things will break down. Like subway cars.
So quit looking for somebody else to blame, Gov. Baker. You want the T to work? Fund it properly.
Change your mind about increasing the gas tax, and put the money into the T. A graduated state income tax would be another great way to fund mass transit.
Get the money from the people who have it. The one-percenters may not ride the T, but their workers do, so rich people need the T as much as the rest of us.
Public services have made Massachusetts a great place to live, in spite of the weather.
Gov. Baker, you helped Gov. Weld undermine those services. Now you have a chance to make up for that mistake. Don’t blow it.

Friday, April 10, 2015

Scottish Proverbs


The dictionary defines a "proverb" as a short saying stating a general truth or piece of advice. The Scots language is full of such pithy phrases and there are many huge collections of them, many dating back hundreds of years. Here's a selection of the best - many with a touch of humour about them too...
A bird in the hand is worth ten fleein'.
A day to come seems longer than a year that's gone.
A fu' purse never lacks friends.
A fool may earn money, but it takes a wise man to keep it.
A good tale never tires in the telling.
Ale sellers shouldna' be tale tellers.
A liar shou'd hae a good memory.
A light purse makes a heavy heart. (Definitely a Scottish one that!)
A misty morning may become a clear day.
A's weel that ends weel.
A penny saved is a penny gained.
A rich man's wooing need seldom be a long one.
A thread will tie an honest man better than a chain a rogue.
A turn well done is soon done.
A wise lawyer never goes to law himself.
Be happy while you're living, for you're a long time dead.
Beggars cannae be choosers.
Be slow in choosing a friend but slower in changing him.
Better bend than break.
Better keep the devil at the door than have to turn him out of the house.
Better the day, the better deed.
Better to be alone than in bad company.
Birds of a feather flock a' thegither.
Choose your wife with her nightcap on!
Danger and delight grow on one stalk.
Do as the lassies do - say "no" and tak it.
Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds you plant. (So said Robert Louis Stevenson)
Double drinks are good for drouth (thirst).
Egotism is an alphabet of one letter.
Enough is as good as a feast.
Fools look to tomorrow; wise men use tonight.
Fools make feasts and wise men eat them,
The wise make jests and fools repeat them.
Forbid a fool a thing and that he will do.
Friends are lost by calling often and calling seldom.
From saving comes having.
Get what you can and keep what you have - that's the way to get rich.
Give you an inch and you'll tak an ell. (An ell was a Scottish yard of 37 inches).
Glasses and lasses are bruckle ( = brittle, fragile) ware!
He can make a kirk (church) or a mill of it.
He goes long barefoot that waits for dead men's shoes.
He has licked the butter aff my bread.
He's as welcome as water in a holed ship.
He's the slave of all slaves who serve's none but himself.
He that lives upon hope has a slim diet.
He that teaches himself has a fool for a master.
"It is an ill cause that the lawyers think shame o'"
It's an ill wind that blaws naebody any gude.
(Most bad things that happen have a good result for someone).
Learn young, learn fair; learn old, learn more.
Little wit o' the head gives the feet much to do.
Look after the pennies and the pounds will take care of themselves.
Mair by guid luck than guid guidance.
Money is flat and was meant to be piled up.
Mony cooks ne’er made a gude kail.
(Too many cooks spoil the broth).
Nae fool like an auld fool.
Ne'er cast a clout till May be oot.
(Don't put aside winter clothing until May be out. But Scottish weather isn't that cold
In this context, "May" is the Mayflower or Hawthorn, which blooms well before the end of May).
Never draw your dirk when a blow will do it.
Never marry for money. You can borrow it cheaper.
"Never show your teeth unless you can bite"
Of twa ills, choose the least.
One for sorrow, two for joy,
Three for a girl, four for a boy.
Five for silver, six for gold,
And seven for a secret that must never be told.
One man's meat is another man's poison.
Our business in this world is not to succeed, but to continue to fail in good spirits. (Attributed to Robert Louis Stevenson).
Pay him in his own coin.
Penny wise and pound foolish.
The cure may be worse than the disease.
Time and tide will tarry on nae man.
To marry is to halve your rights and double your duties.
Twelve highlanders and a bagpipe make a rebellion.
What may be done at any time will be done at no time.
What we first learn we best ken (know).
When one door sticks, another one opens.
When wine sinks words swim.
Whisky may not cure the common cold, but it fails more agreeably than most other things.
Willful waste makes woeful want.
Wink at small faults - your own are muckle (great)
Ye canna make a silk purse of a sow's lug (a pig's ear).
You may as well keep your breath to cool your porridge.

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Following the Money: Financing the Slave Trade

Following the Money: Financing the Slave Trade

Slavery and The slave-based tobacco economy that sustained the Chesapeake region was in deep crisis in the late-18th century and some Virginia leaders even talked about ending slavery. But technological innovations to process cotton soon gave new life to slavery, which would flourish in the new nation as never before.

http://www.ushistory.org/us/22b.asp

Slave Ownership Patterns

Despite their numbers, slaves typically comprised a minority of the local population.

Only in antebellum South Carolina and Mississippi did slaves outnumber free persons. Most Southerners owned no slaves and most slaves lived in small groups rather than on large plantations. Less than one-quarter of white Southerners held slaves, with half of these holding fewer than five and fewer than 1 percent owning more than one hundred. In 1860, the average number of slaves residing together was about ten.~~ In the pre-Civil War United States, a stronger case can be made that slavery played a critical role in economic development. One crop, slave-grown cotton provided over half of all U.S. export earnings. By 1840, the South grew 60 percent of the world's cotton and provided some 70 percent of the cotton consumed by the British textile industry. Thus slavery paid for a substantial share of the capital, iron, and manufactured good that laid the basis for American economic growth. In addition, precisely because the South specialized in cotton production, the North developed a variety of businesses that provided services for the slave South, including textile factories, a meat processing industry, insurance companies, shippers, and cotton brokers.~~

 http://eh.net/encyclopedia/slavery-in-the-united-states/

By the time shots were fired on Fort Sumter in April 1861, cotton was the core ingredient of the world’s most important manufacturing industry.~~  {estimated} 20 million people worldwide—one out of every 65 people alive—were involved in the cultivation of cotton or the production of cotton cloth.


Seth Rockman, a historian at Brown University, himself at work on a book about how New England industries manufactured plantation goods, said Mr. Baptist had advanced the story by connecting “the day-to-day violence of plantation labor to the largest macroeconomic questions of the West’s economic takeoff in the 19th century.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/04/books/the-half-has-never-been-told-follows-the-money-of-slavery.html?_r=0

Several global financial institutions started off as slave profiteering firms before growing into multi-national behemoths of today.~~ JPMorgan, The predecessor to the Royal Bank of Scotland was a slaving enterprise promoted and maintained by the ruling elites of United Kingdom, Aetna, a billion dollar insurance company was involved in slave profiteering activities, New York Life Insurance  in 2002 donated documents about the insurance it sold to slave owners, 

N M Rothschild & Sons Bank in London was linked to slavery. The company that was one of the biggest names in the City of London had previously undisclosed links to slavery in the British colonies.

Brown Brothers-Harrimanis the oldest and largest private investment bank and securities firm in the United States, founded in 1818. USA Today found that the New York merchant bank of James and William Brown, currently known as Brown Bros. Harriman owned hundreds of enslaved Africans and financed the cotton economy by lending millions to southern planters, merchants and cotton brokers.


 Brown Brothers Harriman went from financing the slave trade to financing the industrial might that drove Hitler's rise to power.  Prescott Bush and George Herbert (Bert) Walker were directors of the London-affiliated New York banking house of Brown Brothers-Harriman and its various fronts, which funded and directed the military-industrial complex behind Hitler and the Nazi

revolution.http://www.georgewalkerbush.net/bushfamilyfundedhitler.htm)

Brown Brothers Harriman were also instrumental in funding the Eugenics Movement and establishing research facilities at Cold harbor NY.

n 1910, ~~~ the widow of railroad baron E.H Harriman donated $10,000 to establish the Eugenics Record Office.

http://shaybo-therisingtide.blogspot.com/2012/02/eugenics-record-office-ero.html

In 2006 Tony Blair, prime minister, expressed “deep sorrow” for the UK’s role in the slave trade.

http://www.africaresource.com/rasta/sesostris-the-great-the-egyptian-hercules/the-slavers-of-wall-street-investment-banks-and-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-oguejiofo-annu/
Lehman Brothers was started off as a brotherhood of slave dealers and their profiteers, Wachovia Bank, has also apologised for its predecessors having owned and profited from slaves. It set up a programme offering $1bn in loans for black car dealerships,  Yale University and Brown University has set up a commission to look into links with slavery and how it should make amends.


Mr. Baptist shows how the Bank of the United States (in which federal funds were deposited) was lending money to slave traders.

 Planters would mortgage their slaves to raise money, and those mortgages were sold to investors. Mr. Johnson also cited Mr. Baptist’s argument that huge increases in cotton-picking over the course of the antebellum period were due almost entirely to violence against slaves. Historians have often attributed that increase to the emergence of new, easier-to-pick strains of cotton and the cotton gin, Mr. Johnson said.
In England alone, which still counted two-thirds of the world’s mechanical spindles in its factories, the livelihood of between one-fifth and one-fourth of the population was based on the industry; one-tenth of all British capital was invested in it, and close to one-half of all exports consisted of cotton yarn and cloth.~~

Monday, April 6, 2015

Jb Francis Dianah Collins



Oct 18, 2011

Jb Francis 
 
Dwight, my interest at the present time is this. Concerning Mary Jane and who she married. See Census records below: I am pretty sure Mary Jane Collins is mother of Dianah Collins who was mother of children by Samuel and Granville Combs. JB



1850 United States Federal Census > Kentucky > Letcher HH # 48/48 Gipson Henry 20 M Farmer VA
Cintha 42 F NC<<<Cinthia Williams wife of Larkin Collins 
Collins Sanders 15 M Farmer KY
Finley 11 M KY
Mary 11 F KY<<<Mary Jane mother of Dianah Collins
Watson 07 M Ky
1880 LETCHER CO., KY CENSUS
COLLINS, SANDERS 45 HEAD
SYLVIA 35 WIFE
FINDLEY 21 SON
STEPHEN 5
ELIZABETH 3
COLLINS, NANCY 25 SERVANT
MARGARET DAU 2/12TRANSCRIBED BY JB FRANCIS
1880 LETCHER CO., KY CENSUS; HH# 742 
COLLINS,FINLEY 42
NANCY WIFE 43
DICY 14
MARY 13
CYNTHIA 11
LUCINDA 1

Further, Dwight, these sources lend a little more info for you to consider. Per the Adams Family of Southeastern Kentucky Book, Dorothy Griffith; Rockhouse Moses Adams had a son by Hannah Collins, and he reared him as Hiram Adams. This Hiram married Dianah Collins. See page 146. In Appalachia Crossroads by Clayton R Cox, page 140 also mentions Hiram and Dianah (Amburgey) as parents of Moses Adams born 1888. On page 147 of the Adams book lists Hiram Adams, Moses' son by Hannah Collins married Dianah Collins on 14 July 1881 Letcher MR 6:13. They had at least one child Moses Adams. Hiram was called Bad Hiram and was killed by two men at his fathers home. JB Francis

Thursday, April 2, 2015

New Madrid Earthquake, December 1811 - April 1812

New Madrid Earthquake

 Tennessee State Library and Archives
Isoseismal Map for the Arkansas Earthquake of December 16, 1811
  Isoseismal Map for the Arkansas Earthquake 
of December 16, 1811

USGS Seismicity of the United States,
Professional Paper 1527

by Carl W. Stover & Jerry L Coffman

New Madrid Earthquake, December 1811 - April 1812
The worst earthquake in American history shook the country on December 16, 1811, beginning a series of three major earthquakes in the Mississippi River Valley with epicenters focused in northeast Arkansas and southeast Missouri. Spanning a period of four months, it was the most frightening sequence of earthquakes ever to occur in the United States.
The New Madrid, Missouri, earthquake was felt over a two-million-square-mile area with tremors reported as far away as London. Shockwaves were recorded from Canada to the Gulf Coast, and there were accounts of chimneys that came crashing down in Maine.
The quake caused huge cracks in the earth's surface. Fissures, large and small, ejected coal and sand into the air; new lakes formed, and the Mississippi River briefly reversed its course after rising and falling, causing giant waves to engulf and capsize boats. Some of the most dramatic effects occurred along rivers and streams as banks collapsed, covering rivers with floating trees. The powerful turbulence in the land and water reportedly enveloped an entire Indian village and, while no official casualty numbers exist, untold scores of people were never accounted for. The most lasting geographic effect was the creation of Reelfoot Lake, a body of water in a fissure formed by the earthquake.
Cypress trees in Reelfoot Lake, 1938
Cypress trees in Reelfoot Lake, April 10, 1938
  RG 82, Department of Conservation Photograph Collection  
Other earthquake phenomena were also reported, such as sand blows (also called sand boils or sand volcanoes), seismic tar balls (small balls of solidified petrolium found in sand blows and fissures), earthquake lights (caused by the immense pressure on quartz crystals in the ground), earthquake smog, loud thunder-like explosions, and strange animal behavior prior to the quakes.
As the rumblings ceased, residents returned to New Madrid to repair homes and buildings. People continued to settle in the region despite numerous minor tremors that continued off and on for years following the major quakes in 1811 and 1812.
The fault has been largely dormant since those major quakes, but communities in the New Madrid fault zone continue to remain on guard in case another big tremor should strike the region.


The Mississippi River as seen at sunset near the Shelby Forest State Park, 1948
The Mississippi River as seen at sunset
near the Shelby Forest State Park,
Memphis, Tennessee, January 3, 1948

  RG 82, Department of Conservation Photograph Collection  
Tecumseh's Prophecy
Tecumseh (1768-1813) was a well-known diplomat, orator, peacemaker, and prophet. He was born in a Shawnee village in Old Piqua (now Ohio) and named "Panther Passing Across." He was raised as a warrior and eventually became one of the most trusted and admired Shawnee leaders. Tecumseh traveled all over the Northwest, South, and Eastern Mississippi Valley to exhort other Indian tribes to stem the tide of white settlers into the region in the early 1800s.
Tecumseh prophesied there would be a major earthquake at New Madrid many months before it occurred. He was accurate down to the very day, and his prophecy was interpreted as a signal for all Native Americans to unite in defense of their lands against invasion by European settlers.




Mouths of the Mississipps, ca. 1800
  Mouths of the Mississippi, ca. 1800  
Detail of a print by Benjamin H. Latrobe
Nell Savage Mahoney Papers
Accounts of the New Madrid Earthquake
John James Audubon:
...Never had I witnessed anything like this before, though I had heard of earthquakes. I found myself rocking on my horse and I moved to and fro with him like a child in a cradle, expecting the ground to open at any moment and reveal an abyss to engulf me and all around me. The fearful convulsion lasted only minutes, however.
Almost every day or night for weeks shock succeeded shock, but gradually diminished into more vibrations of the earth�The quake ceased, but not until after it had caused serious consequences in other neighboring places, rending the earth and sinking islands�




Cypress trees and a view of Reelfoot Lake near Blue Bank, 1938
Cypress trees and a view of Reelfoot Lake
near Blue Bank, April 10, 1938

  RG 82, Department of Conservation Photograph Collection  
Eliza Bryan:
...On the 16th December, 1811, about two o�clock, A.M. we were visited by a violent shock of an earthquake, accompanied by a very awful noise resembling loud but distant thunder, but more hoarse and vibrating, which was followed in a few minutes by the complete saturation of the atmosphere, with sulphurous vapor, causing total darkness. The screams of the affrighted inhabitants running to and fro, not knowing where to go or what to do - the cries of the fowls and beasts of every species - the cracking of trees falling, and the roaring of the Mississippi - the current of which was retrograde for a few minutes, owing, it is supposed, to an irruption in its bed - formed a scene truly horrible...


Mississippi River at the Shelby Forest State Park, 1953
Mississippi River at the Shelby Forest State Park,
Memphis, Tennessee, September 9, 1953

  RG 82, Department of Conservation Photograph Collection  
Mary Morriss Smith:
...In 1811 and 12 the people were greatly excited and alarmed. They were just on the eve of a war with England. then the earthquakes. They knew not the cause of those heavy shakes. The houses, The trees, the whole earth shook. Some thought the end of the world was come and time would be no more. Those shakes sometimes occurred in the night and everyone rose up alarmed. There was a story told of an old man who was looked on as one of the best of men. There occurred a very hard shock one night, he sprang up and started to the window no doubt expecting to see the Lord and his angels coming in the clouds and hear Gabriels trumpet blow, when his wife saw his actions she called to him to wait for her.
He replied, "I may be in heaven a thousand years before I think to look for you." That idea don't accord with people ideas of the present day who think their friends will meet them at the "beautiful gate and welcome them in"...
Mary Morriss Smith memoirsMary Morriss Smith memoirsMary Morriss Smith memoirs
Mary Morriss Smith memoirs, 1886-1895
Archives Manuscript Collection


Section researched and written by Lucinda Kinsall, Library Assistant